Dr Rex Dexter aka R Andrew Ohge

sustainableprosperity:

In Oakland, school officials are undertaking an ambitious plan to transform the school lunch menu.  They’re working to source food from local farms, instead of big companies, and provide California food for California kids.

Strikingly, the change was precipitated by research done by the schoolchildren themselves, according to Jennifer LeBarre, director of nutrition for the Oakland schools and a local food advocate:

One of the things that inspired us to do the farm-to-school movement is a class project that Cleveland Elementary School fifth graders did.

Amazing Lost Footage of Muhammad Ali speaking on Illuminati Control and Racial Perception in America

Published on Sep 17, 2014

Great Lost Footage of the late great Muhammad Ali speaking on issues dealing with race in America and worldwide. 

Derogatory Systematic Brainwash tools implanted in the English language.

http://youtu.be/L0-KPrUVmIU

How Superbugs Hitch a Ride From Hog Farms Into Your Community
—By Tom Philpott| Sat Sep. 13, 2014 6:00 AM EDT
[Photo: If you walk this line, you might just get MRSA in your nose. Farm Sanctuary/Flickr]
Factory-scale farms don’t just house hundreds of genetically similar animals in tight quarters over vast cesspools collecting their waste. 
They also house a variety of bacteria that live within those unfortunate beasts’ guts. 
And when you dose the animals daily with small amounts of antibiotics—a common practice—the bacteria strains in these vast germ reservoirs quite naturally develop the ability to withstand anti-bacterial treatments.
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria leave these facilities in two main ways. 
The obvious one is meat: As Food and Drug Administration data shows, the pork chops, chicken parts, and ground beef you find on supermarket shelves routinely carry resistant bacteria strains. 
But there’s another, more subtle way: through the people who work on these operations.
In a new paper, a team of researchers from Johns Hopkins and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill took nasal swabs from 22 North Carolina hog facility workers over 14 days. 
The results: 10 of them proved to be “persistent” carriers of a strain of bacteria associated with livestock called Staphylococcus aureus—that is, they carried for up to four days after their last day at work. Of those 10, 7 of the workers carried a form of Staphylococcus aureus that’s resistant to one or more antibiotics.
The researchers report that their study is the first to test the persistence of the bacteria strains that workers pick up at livestock farms. 
"Researchers had believed that livestock-associated bacteria would clear from the noses of hog workers quickly—within 24 hours," the press release accompanying the report states. Apparently, not so much.
If the sample size sounds small, it is. 
Most hog production in North Carolina takes place within facilities owned or operated by large meat-processing companies, and they aren’t eager to cooperate with independent researchers. 
Finding workers to participate is tricky. 
"This study would not have been possible without a strong partnership between researchers and community-based organisations that have the trust of members of communities in areas where the density of industrial hog production is high," the authors state.
The study comes on the heels of another one, published on PLOS One in 2013, which compared nasal swabs from workers on industrial-scale hog farms with those of workers on antibiotic-free operations. 
Six of 34 industrial-farm workers carried multidrug-resistant forms of livestock-associated staph, compared to none of the antibiotic-free farmworkers.
While these and other studies suggest that farmworkers are moving resistant bacteria from farms and into the world, potentially infecting others, they don’t prove that MRSA and other potentially deadly staph strains are spreading from this source. 
You can carry a staph germ in your nose without becoming infected with it. 
The authors say they’re now studying whether the workers, their families, and their surrounding communities are more prone to infections.
Meanwhile, a University of Iowa study earlier this year found that people who live within a mile of a hog operation are nearly three times more likely to carry MRSA in their noses than the general population. 
A 2013 Johns Hopkins study that looked at actual MRSA infections in Pennsylvania found that people who live near fields treated with industrially farmed hog manure are “significantly” more likely to be treated for infections, and that people who live near hog operations showed a “similar but weaker association” with MRSA infection rates.
http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2014/09/think-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria-stop-factory-farm-door-think-again

How Superbugs Hitch a Ride From Hog Farms Into Your Community

—By Tom Philpott| Sat Sep. 13, 2014 6:00 AM EDT

[Photo: If you walk this line, you might just get MRSA in your nose. Farm Sanctuary/Flickr]

Factory-scale farms don’t just house hundreds of genetically similar animals in tight quarters over vast cesspools collecting their waste. 

They also house a variety of bacteria that live within those unfortunate beasts’ guts. 

And when you dose the animals daily with small amounts of antibiotics—a common practice—the bacteria strains in these vast germ reservoirs quite naturally develop the ability to withstand anti-bacterial treatments.

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria leave these facilities in two main ways. 

The obvious one is meat: As Food and Drug Administration data shows, the pork chops, chicken parts, and ground beef you find on supermarket shelves routinely carry resistant bacteria strains. 

But there’s another, more subtle way: through the people who work on these operations.

In a new paper, a team of researchers from Johns Hopkins and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill took nasal swabs from 22 North Carolina hog facility workers over 14 days. 

The results: 10 of them proved to be “persistent” carriers of a strain of bacteria associated with livestock called Staphylococcus aureus—that is, they carried for up to four days after their last day at work. Of those 10, 7 of the workers carried a form of Staphylococcus aureus that’s resistant to one or more antibiotics.

The researchers report that their study is the first to test the persistence of the bacteria strains that workers pick up at livestock farms. 

"Researchers had believed that livestock-associated bacteria would clear from the noses of hog workers quickly—within 24 hours," the press release accompanying the report states. Apparently, not so much.

If the sample size sounds small, it is. 

Most hog production in North Carolina takes place within facilities owned or operated by large meat-processing companies, and they aren’t eager to cooperate with independent researchers. 

Finding workers to participate is tricky. 

"This study would not have been possible without a strong partnership between researchers and community-based organisations that have the trust of members of communities in areas where the density of industrial hog production is high," the authors state.

The study comes on the heels of another one, published on PLOS One in 2013, which compared nasal swabs from workers on industrial-scale hog farms with those of workers on antibiotic-free operations.

Six of 34 industrial-farm workers carried multidrug-resistant forms of livestock-associated staph, compared to none of the antibiotic-free farmworkers.

While these and other studies suggest that farmworkers are moving resistant bacteria from farms and into the world, potentially infecting others, they don’t prove that MRSA and other potentially deadly staph strains are spreading from this source. 

You can carry a staph germ in your nose without becoming infected with it. 

The authors say they’re now studying whether the workers, their families, and their surrounding communities are more prone to infections.

Meanwhile, a University of Iowa study earlier this year found that people who live within a mile of a hog operation are nearly three times more likely to carry MRSA in their noses than the general population. 

A 2013 Johns Hopkins study that looked at actual MRSA infections in Pennsylvania found that people who live near fields treated with industrially farmed hog manure are “significantly” more likely to be treated for infections, and that people who live near hog operations showed a “similar but weaker association” with MRSA infection rates.

http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2014/09/think-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria-stop-factory-farm-door-think-again

In Food Production, As In So Many Other Areas Of Life, Maybe It’s The Little Things That Matter Most.

By Richard Oswald

Scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing a model of the microbial environment inside the human gut. 

The model will be composed of three-dimensional human intestinal cells cultured with specific gut bacteria.

Americans are getting bigger. 

There’s no doubt about it. 

At 5 feet 8 inches and 150 pounds, I was one of the biggest kids in my freshman class. 

It was that fact, rather than my doubtful athletic ability, that earned me one of about 40 spots on our High School football squad. 

That’s because the coach wanted to impress opposing teams with our size. 

But today I have grown.  

At a couple inches under 6 feet and 195, I am dwarfed by as much as four inches and 40 pounds. 

My grandsons are bigger and stronger now than I have ever been.

Is that because they have “bigger” genes or have human diets changed that much over the years?

Volumes have been written about modern diets, rich in sugar and salt, by writers like Mark Bittman, who recently wrote a New York Times column titled "The Drinkers Manifesto".

Bittman has devoted much of his writing to pointing out nutritional deficiencies, especially the presence of high fructose corn syrup and other applications of corn in modern fast food diets. 

In his drinker’s manifesto he qualifies perceived overindulgence in distilled spirits, pointing out that national health costs from obesity are nearly 25% greater than those of alcoholism.

(For the record, corn-hater Mark left out that a lot of the alcohol humans consume starts out as corn.)

What’s missing from the food debate are new revelations regarding the human biome and ways bacteria interact with our bodies to make us healthier … or not.

The probiotic movement has been around for years. 

That’s why some people eat types of yogurt that are believed to help digestion and sustain favorable fauna in the gut. 

Research supports that.

Bacteria can harm or hurt. 

That’s also why we have antibiotics, to help eliminate infectious bugs that attack our bodies. 

But now researchers say we need the right bugs, not only for good digestion, but to keep us healthy by advising our bodies on how to behave. 

They’ve gone so far as to say that good bacteria communicate with human brains and the bodies they inhabit, to call for antibodies—or call them off as with autoimmune disorders—or even help ward off cancer.

And there is proof that some conditions, like autism and its side effects, can be improved simply by changing or adding bacteria located inside the bodies of autistic people.

So what does that have to do with what we eat?

Over the years we’ve come to rely on antibiotics for meat and fish production.

We’ve even used antibiotic resistance as a tool in the production of new varieties of genetically modified crops.

As we ingest more of these things, could they be subtly altering the genetic landscape of our human biome?

The fact that so many types of booze, in this case whiskey, start out as corn must keep Mr. Bittman awake at night.

For instance low-level feeding of antibiotics in meat production is a common and approved practice.

Besides helping ward off disease, antibiotics added to feed have been shown to increase appetites of animals that consume them. 

No one knows why exactly, they simply eat more and gain weight faster. 

Then we dump antibiotic laden manure and chicken litter from those operations back onto our soil, where it nurtures crops.

But some also finds its way into our water.

What if antibiotic use in food does more than what most critics worry about, which is that we’re creating bacteria that resist antibiotics? 

What if a more harmful and immediate result is increased appetite, cravings or disease set off by a reaction from tiny creatures inside us in response to small amounts of left over chemicals originally fed to animals or plants that became our food?

What if those creatures inside us respond by making us less healthy, or even sick?

So far that possibility has been ignored by regulators and the health community at large.

Critics of our food system (like Bittman) universally condemn availability of foods that contribute to obesity.  

In his “drinkers manifesto” he points out that alcohol, with its empty calories, has no nutrition label as sugar-laced soft drinks do and cites one opinion (backed up by Benjamin Franklin), that perhaps alcohol is proof of a God’s love.

Franklin is widely misquoted as to his choice of alcohol.

What he said ran a little deeper than just love of beer. 

These are Franklin’s exact words as interpreted from their original French:  “We hear of the conversion of water into wine at the marriage in Cana, as of a miracle.  

But this conversion is, through the goodness of God, made every day before our eyes.  

Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards, and which incorporates itself with the grapes to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy!”

What’s missing from some modern diets is more than just nutritional balance. 

It’s understanding of the tiny, natural biological interactions that take place every day in the course of food production. 

Most of it seems boring and lengthy — invisible to the human eye. 

Crops and livestock mature over months. 

Fine wine works the same way. 

Just as the automotive industry relies on thousands of imported parts delivered when they’re needed, our food industry is working to speed up delivery of prepared meals across a plastic countertop to waiting consumers.

We’ve placed our faith in an industrial food revolution based on low wages, cheap ingredients and corporate tax dodges.

There’s a religious hymn dating back to the 19th century, “All Things Great and Small”.

It begins like this:

All things bright and beautiful,

All creatures great and small,

All things wise and wonderful,

The Lord God made them all.

Ben Franklin may never have realized the important contribution bacteria made to the conversion of grape juice to wine, or even his own good health. 

But he understood the connection that exists between our world and what we eat.

And that sometimes respect and faith, even for the smallest things, can be very important to us all.

Richard Oswald, a fifth generation farmer, lives in Langdon, Missouri, and is president of the Missouri Farmers Union.

http://www.dailyyonder.com/letter-langdon-all-things-great-and-small/2014/09/17/7528

Why AM I Here-And Why Do I Choose The Posts I Put Up & Share?This comes from a response to a comment someone made to criticize Alex Jones, Mike Adams, and vis-a-vis, me. I HAVE broken stories first from time to time. [Some of you all have re-posted them without mentioning me. It’s okay. So has some well-regarded News Sources, who glean through the web’s offerings much like I do.]I find something on line or in my E-Mail that strikes a chord in the part of me that is a Pattern Analyst who’s morphed into a “News Editor” come Activist.Remember the root word of Activist IS Act-it’s important if you want to understand WHY we do what we do.Let’s get real about this…none of us are likely going to be where those stories originate, and neither were the old school News Editors who had to take tips, raw stories and footage, and decide what was most important to promote through the vehicle they had.What they, Alex, Mike, and all the rest of us who post stories have to do , is make those choices. I sieve through hundreds of stories everyday, many ARE put up on the web by people observing them-like having in the field reporters calling, telegraphing, or faxing them in old school style, so I can play “News Editor” and pick stories, whether I LIKE them or not, that I feel we need to know about.To that we have to add the reality that the N American audience is jaded, and somewhat asleep to anything but what’s most “in your face”.Think I’m over-exaggerating?One has only to look at the success of “Reality TV” and MSM Pundits like Bill O’Reilly, who are often more about entertainment than content…hey DO get people’s attention, which is only what Alex, Mike AND I have to try to do every day. I’m about to wade through the hundreds of News letters, Blog notices, and direct E-Mails I get daily to pick out what I’m going to post. That effort is made a little challenging due to the fact I have CHF and Myotonic Dystrophy I, which makes it difficult to really “lean in” to even such a “sedentary” quest. 

I say that not to elicit pity, but to clarify the depths of my commitment.SO…until it kills me, I WILL continue to research what I find, I won’t always get it right, but will more often than not, because it’s important to me. The more important I think the story is, the harder I push it, and I DO get emotional when I think the stories are crucial to “We The People” for ANY reason.My deceased Father-In-Law used to wonder about such emotionalism. I reminded him when he was drawn into his favorite Atlanta Braves, you could hear him hollering from the street through closed windows, so why shouldn’t everyone else be as enthusiastic and emotionally involved with the other things, some of which matter even more?He was an academically learned man. HE was also a humble man-honest to a fault. He was silent for a moment, then admitted-albeit grudgingly-that I was correct.If Alex, Mike, or I get it wrong from time to time, we are also committed to LEARNING. If we get emotional, it’s because WE CARE. And if that’s a problem for anybody, they’re welcome to GO ELSEWHERE, because NONE OF US ARE CHANGING OR BACKING DOWN!So…are we all on the same page, now?R Andrew Ohge aka (Dr) Rex Dexter
About Me: http://about.me/drrexdexter
Google+ About Page: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RexDexter/about

Why AM I Here-And Why Do I Choose The Posts I Put Up & Share?

This comes from a response to a comment someone made to criticize Alex Jones, Mike Adams, and vis-a-vis, me. 

I HAVE broken stories first from time to time. [Some of you all have re-posted them without mentioning me. It’s okay. So has some well-regarded News Sources, who glean through the web’s offerings much like I do.]

I find something on line or in my E-Mail that strikes a chord in the part of me that is a Pattern Analyst who’s morphed into a “News Editor” come Activist.

Remember the root word of Activist IS Act-it’s important if you want to understand WHY we do what we do.

Let’s get real about this…none of us are likely going to be where those stories originate, and neither were the old school News Editors who had to take tips, raw stories and footage, and decide what was most important to promote through the vehicle they had.

What they, Alex, Mike, and all the rest of us who post stories have to do , is make those choices. 

I sieve through hundreds of stories everyday, many ARE put up on the web by people observing them-like having in the field reporters calling, telegraphing, or faxing them in old school style, so I can play “News Editor” and pick stories, whether I LIKE them or not, that I feel we need to know about.

To that we have to add the reality that the N American audience is jaded, and somewhat asleep to anything but what’s most “in your face”.

Think I’m over-exaggerating?

One has only to look at the success of “Reality TV” and MSM Pundits like Bill O’Reilly, who are often more about entertainment than content…hey DO get people’s attention, which is only what Alex, Mike AND I have to try to do every day. 

I’m about to wade through the hundreds of News letters, Blog notices, and direct E-Mails I get daily to pick out what I’m going to post. 

That effort is made a little challenging due to the fact I have CHF and Myotonic Dystrophy I, which makes it difficult to really “lean in” to even such a “sedentary” quest.

I say that not to elicit pity, but to clarify the depths of my commitment.

SO…until it kills me, I WILL continue to research what I find, I won’t always get it right, but will more often than not, because it’s important to me. 

The more important I think the story is, the harder I push it, and I DO get emotional when I think the stories are crucial to “We The People” for ANY reason.

My deceased Father-In-Law used to wonder about such emotionalism. 

I reminded him when he was drawn into his favorite Atlanta Braves, you could hear him hollering from the street through closed windows, so why shouldn’t everyone else be as enthusiastic and emotionally involved with the other things, some of which matter even more?

He was an academically learned man. HE was also a humble man-honest to a fault. He was silent for a moment, then admitted-albeit grudgingly-that I was correct.

If Alex, Mike, or I get it wrong from time to time, we are also committed to LEARNING. If we get emotional, it’s because WE CARE. 

And if that’s a problem for anybody, they’re welcome to GO ELSEWHERE, because NONE OF US ARE CHANGING OR BACKING DOWN!

So…are we all on the same page, now?

R Andrew Ohge aka (Dr) Rex Dexter

About Me: http://about.me/drrexdexter

Google+ About Page: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RexDexter/about

theaatproject:

Scientists Develop Quick And Easy Method To Produce White Blood Cells From Skin Cells
Researchers have developed a quick and easy method, involving just two key ingredients, for the conversion of skin cells into white blood cells. The team believes that the technique could eventually be used to supply patients with personalized immune cells capable of attacking diseased cells or even tumors. The work has been published in Stem Cells.
Induced pluripotent stem cells—adult cells that have been reprogrammed into an embryonic-like state—are attractive in the field of regenerative medicine because of their ability to differentiate into virtually any type of cell found in the body. While research on these cells looks promising, there are several obstacles that need to be overcome before they can be therapeutically useful. Namely, they have a tendency to form tumors and thus have safety issues, and they often fail to successfully engraft into organs or bone marrow. The process of producing, characterizing and differentiating these cells is also lengthy, taking several months from start to finish. But researchers may have now found a much more efficient mechanism to produce white blood cells from adult cells.

theaatproject:

Scientists Develop Quick And Easy Method To Produce White Blood Cells From Skin Cells

Researchers have developed a quick and easy method, involving just two key ingredients, for the conversion of skin cells into white blood cells. The team believes that the technique could eventually be used to supply patients with personalized immune cells capable of attacking diseased cells or even tumors. The work has been published in Stem Cells.

Induced pluripotent stem cells—adult cells that have been reprogrammed into an embryonic-like state—are attractive in the field of regenerative medicine because of their ability to differentiate into virtually any type of cell found in the body. While research on these cells looks promising, there are several obstacles that need to be overcome before they can be therapeutically useful. Namely, they have a tendency to form tumors and thus have safety issues, and they often fail to successfully engraft into organs or bone marrow. The process of producing, characterizing and differentiating these cells is also lengthy, taking several months from start to finish. But researchers may have now found a much more efficient mechanism to produce white blood cells from adult cells.

fyodorpavlov:

"He sits beside the longest shadows. He sweeps the dust behind the door."
New greeting cards are now available in the shop just in time for Halloween! Though, personally, I need witches in my life year round. 
Inspired by my darling lawrencegullo.

fyodorpavlov:

"He sits beside the longest shadows. He sweeps the dust behind the door."

New greeting cards are now available in the shop just in time for Halloween! Though, personally, I need witches in my life year round. 

Inspired by my darling lawrencegullo.

workingamerica:

Even in red states, some candidates don’t dare oppose minimum wage increases

It’s too unpopular not to! GOP Senate candidates in Alaska and Arkansas support minimum wage increases.

Ohio early voting schedule set

Court order keeps Secretary of State John Husted from running amok–famous “Golden Week” restored, where you can register and cast a ballot early.

Fast food owners: Help us, Congress!

The International Franchise Association (IFA) is lobbying Congressional leaders to fight back against fast food strikers and NLRB decisions that make franchises liable for how they treat workers.

Four more companies leave ALEC

Raytheon, Sempra Energy, Illinois Tool Works, and Southern California Edison all cut ALEC ties. Even under pressure, Google remains.

afscme:

Register to vote, vote by mail, and get election reminders - all right here: http://afsc.me/1mfvyjG 

afscme:

Register to vote, vote by mail, and get election reminders - all right here: